registrylogosm.jpg

 
z1
Who's On
A Bird's Home

 
A Bird's Home
 
A Birder's Resources
 
Ask Us A Question Here
 
Cypripedium - Lady Slipper Orchids
 
Audubon Birds of America
 
Become an Affiliate
 
Butterfly Encyclopedia
 
Buy Gift Certificate
 
Estate Feeder - Lower To Fill
 
Photo Gallery
 
Product Reviews
 
The Registry of Nature Habitats Certification
 
Wood Duck Houses
 
Page Rank

Visit our new website: Shop The Home Stores
Products are available for purchase there.



Bird feedersBirdhousesBird Houses Bird Feeders
Click on any product image to see different colors and/or larger image(s) of product.
Bookmark - Add us to your Favorites

>




Visit the Plant Encyclopedia
over 35,000 listings!
Detailed
Bluebird House Plan
$1.50
Download after purchase

All products are now available on our new website: Shop The Home Stores



Wood Duck - Habitat

Wood Duck
(Aix sponsa)

Water, Habitat Components and Area


Water

Water requirements for wood ducks are assumed to be met where suitable brood-rearing and wintering habitat exist.

Interspersion of Habitat Components

In order for successful wood duck reproduction and survival to occur, all the habitat components must be available in relative proximity to one another. Since wood ducks are highly mobile during winter, the most critical aspect of habitat interspersion, or the mix of different habitat types, is the proximity of suitable brood-rearing habitat to nesting habitat in the spring. The highest-quality nesting habitat is of little use if the nearest brood-rearing habitat is more than a mile distant. Likewise, the best brood-rearing habitat will not support wood duck broods if there is no nesting habitat in the vicinity. In southern areas where wood ducks are year-round residents, the best habitats consist of a complex of forested wetland habitats that include live forest, green-tree reservoirs, rivers, oxbows, riparian corridors, beaver ponds, shrub-scrub and robust emergent herbaceous wetlands.

Minimum Habitat Area

Since wood ducks are able to nest at some distance from brood-rearing habitat, no reasonable estimate of minimum nesting habitat size exists. In addition, no good estimates for minimum wintering habitat area are available due to the high mobility of wintering birds. However, at least 10 acres of wetland or other aquatic habitat in a contiguous unit, or in isolated parcels separated by no more than 100 feet of upland, is needed in close proximity to nesting habitat to support brood rearing. Lands outside the immediate planning area should be considered when making the determination of minimum habitat area for wood duck reproduction.

   
Heartwood Wood Duck Joy Box Birdhouse
John James Audubon did some of his most famous bird drawings as he explored on foot along the Natchez Trace, which happens to be located near Star, Mississippi, where we design and make all our Heartwood homes. While birding has come a long way since Audubon’s time, today with our four-season nesting boxes and basic homes, you don’t need to go to anywhere to enjoy all manner of wonderful bird life flocking to your door. Discreet complements to any landscape, these hardy havens are convenient, long lasting and beautiful—the picture perfect start to your life in birding! Season after season, this delightful nesting box is a joy to behold and a breeze to maintain thanks to easy twist latch and slide-front panel that also inverts for winter roosting. So easy to use, so easy to love, it turns birding into child’s play! Rugged construction features 13/16” solid cypress and headed ring shank stainless steel nails.
Dimensions: 11” x 12” x 24 ˝”; 4” hole
Made in the USA!

   
Coveside Bufflehead Duck House
The Bufflehead, with its striking white sides and white patch on its head, is smaller than most cavity nesting ducks.Dependent on nest boxes, this house is ideal due to the scarcity of holes excavated by a large woodpecker or flicker.
RANGE: Breeds in Alaska east to western Quebec, and south in mountains to Washington and Montana. Winters in southern U.S., south to Mexico, Gulf Coast and northern Florida.
HABITAT: Nests on wooded lakes and ponds; winters mainly on salt bays and estuaries.

(17-3/4"h x 9-1/4"w x 11"d)

   
Coveside Common Merganser Duck House
This house provides a perfect nest box for mergansers that normally nest in tree cavities. Positioning a house on a pole in the open water provides extra protection from predators.
RANGE: Breeds across Canada from eastern Alaska, Manitoba and Newfoundland south in mountains to California, northern New Mexico, Great Lakes and northern New England. Winters south to northern Mexico and Georgia; also in Eurasia.
HABITAT: Breeds on wooded rivers and ponds; winters mainly on lakes and rivers, occasionally on salt water.

(24-1/4"h x 11"w x 13"d)


   
Coveside Small Wood Duck House
"Dump nesting" occurs when a number of females lay eggs in a single house, which sometimes results in clutches with over 70 eggs. Mississippi State University did a study of Wood Ducks in an effort to reduce this problem. A smaller nest box was designed and "dump nesting" was reduced. Although fewer ducklings are fledged from each box, the survival rate is improved and the cost per fledgling is less. This box comes with a wire ladder and nesting chips, and the front opens for observation and cleaning.
RANGE: Breeds from British Columbia south to California, and from Montana east to Nova Scotia, and south to Texas and Florida; absent from Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. Winters near Pacific Coast north to Washington, and to New Jersey in East, rarely further north.
HABITAT: Nests beside wooded rivers and ponds. Visits freshwater marshes in late summer and fall.

(17"h x 7-1/2"w x 15"d)

   
Coveside Wood Hooded Merganser Duck House
Coveside's Wood Duck House opens two ways for observation and cleaning, and has an internal ladder for the duckings to climb out. Mother calls ducklings to the protection of the open water at age one day.
RANGE: Breeds from British Columbia south to California, and from Montana east to Nova Scotia, and south to Texas and Florida; absent from Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. Winters near Pacific Coast north to Washington, and to New Jersey in East, rarely further north.
HABITAT: Nests beside wooded rivers and ponds. Visits freshwater marshes in late summer and fall.

(24-1/4"h x 11"w x 15"d)


   
Ads by Google









Duck Decoy Loon Lake Heartwood magnolia Coast

Home Page | Product Review Page | Help

All About Purple Martins

Visit The Registry of Nature Habitats and apply to admit your property. Receive many benefits in addition to 10% discount on all products offered by A Bird's Home.

Visit Our Partners:

Natural Gardens | Reigning Cats & Dogs | A Pond's Home | A Plant's Home |An Instrument's Home


Bird feeders
Online Payments
Woodside Gardens
The Registry of Nature Habitats A Plant's Home
Copyright A Plant's Home 1999 -
All Rights Reserved

Last Updated: