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Butterflies of Virginia -- Neonympha areolata

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Butterflies of North America

Butterflies of Virginia

Georgia Satyr (Neonympha areolata)
JPG -- species photo

Georgia Satyr (Neonympha areolata [J. E. Smith])

Wing span: 1 7/16 - 1 15/16 inches (3.7 - 4.9 cm).

Identification: Upperside is brown with no markings. Underside of hindwing has a row of elongated submarginal eyespots which are encircled by a red line.

Life history: Adults have a slow, bobbing flight and rest often. Males patrol low over vegetation to find females. Eggs are laid singly on host plants; caterpillars eat leaves. Fourth-stage caterpillars hibernate.

Flight: One brood from June-July in New Jersey; two broods from April-September in most of the range; many broods through most of the year in Florida.

Caterpillar hosts: Probably sedges (Cyperaceae).

Adult food: Not reported.

Habitat: Grassy openings in sandy pinewoods or pine barrens.

Range: Southeastern United States from southern Virginia south along the Atlantic Coast to the Florida Keys, west to southeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Texas.

Conservation: Not usually required.

The Nature Conservancy Global Rank: G5 - Demonstrably secure globally, though it may be quite rare in parts of its range, especially at the periphery.

Management needs: Depends on fire succession habitats.

Note: It has been determined that this species actually consists of two separate species, Neonympha areolata and N. helicta. Future revisions of this page will take this into account.

References:

Gatrelle, R. R. 1999.  Huebner’s helicta: the forgotten Neonympha. The Taxonomic 
     Report 8: 1-8.

Opler, P. A. and G. O. Krizek. 1984. Butterflies east of the Great Plains. Johns 
     Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. 294 pages, 54 color plates.

Opler, P. A. and V. Malikul. 1992. A field guide to eastern butterflies. Peterson 
     field guide #4. Houghton-Mifflin Co., Boston. 396 pages, 48 color plates.

Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press, 
     Stanford, Calif. 583 pages, 64 color plates.

Author: Jane M. Struttmann

State and Regional References:

Glassberg,  J.  1993.  Butterflies Through Binoculars: A Field Guide to 
     Butterflies in the Boston-New York-Washington Region.  Oxford Univ. Press, 
     New York, N.Y.  160 pp.    

Clark, A.H. and Clark, L.F. 1951.  The Butterflies of Virginia.  Smithsonian
     Miscellaneous collection No. 116:1-239.

Layberry, R.A., Hall, P.W. & Lafontaine, D.J., 1998.  The Butterflies of 
     Canada.  University of Toronto Press, Toronto, ON.  280 pp. 
     
Opler, P.A. 1998. A field guide to eastern butterflies, revised format.
     Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston.     

Woodbury, E.N.  1994.  Butterflies of Delmarva.  Delaware Nature Society, Inc., 
     Tidewater Publishers, Centreville, MD.  138 pp.  [NOTE: this book only 
     treats True Butterflies (Papilionoidea).  It does not treat Skippers 
     (Hesperioidea).]
Georgia Satyr (Neonympha areolata)
distribution map
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